Three interview questions you need to be ready to answer!

Whatever you prepare for, whatever you hope you’ll face, you need to know the answers to these three questions to make sure you stay ahead of your interview, because no longer will companies be asking you where you see yourself in 5 years or the like. So either directly or indirectly be prepared to answer these three important questions. Interview Basics

Can you do the job?

Will you love the job?

Can we tolerate working with you?

Can you do the job?
In this day and age jobs keep getting more complex and even more specialized, and employers need to be assured that you can and will do this job. And that isn’t just making sure you have the technical know-how, or the experience but also that you’ll be able to learn, adapt, think critically and be on top of new technology and approaches, your ability to communicate with others to take your job to the next level and so on. Because the job you get today is likely to keep changing and evolving as time goes on.

Your examples of how you continually adapt and how you have value addition to whatever it is you do and your eagerness to stay at the front of new technological trends, work with others, manage risks and think critically to make decisions will them a broader view of what you can bring to the organization

Will you love the job?
It isn’t just a common thought anymore, research focuses on employee disengagement and unhappiness as a massive cost to the organization. That makes employees not just look out for another person to hire but a person who is passionate about the position and willing to make new strides in it.

So there may not be direct questions at how eager you are for this job, but when the opportunity presents take charge and prove on what this job means to your passion and how you can positively influence the growth of the company. The questions of your previous workplace may want you to say bad things but the most important factor is how appreciative you were of it. Make sure, as you answer questions about your work experience, you share with the interviewer the aspects of work that you love. What are the things at work that “turn you on” and make time disappear? Do you love solving problems? Are you passionate about satisfying customers? Do you thrive on the details or guiding the big picture? Do you need to work on teams? Are you jazzed by beating the competition?

What are the things you need in a role to be fully engaged? And what are the things that disengage you? Be honest about both; it’s in everyone’s best interests for you to work in a job that you love.
Can we tolerate working with you?

As much as it is one position, you need to be able to positively say you are a team player. The way you get along with your employees shows courage, positivity and most of all teamwork.

But more than that, as organizations recognize that their employees are their only true source of lasting competitive advantage, organizational culture and competencies are becoming more critical. More than products/services or technology, this is what differentiates an organization from the competition.

So at the end of it they will be looking into identifying qualities within you that reflect the company’s core values and competencies.After all, if you’re a good fit, you’re likely to be more engaged and perform better.

To excel at this, start by getting as much understanding of the organization’s culture, values and core competencies as you can. There are lots of areas on their website that will give you clues to these. Look at their company history, careers page, mission and values. Look at the words they use to describe themselves, their products/services, market and customers. And decide for yourself whether the organization will be a good fit for you, and you for it.

If you think you’re a good match, let them know, and all the while you answer your questions at the interview tell them about your shared values and competencies. Give examples of how you’ve exhibited those on the job and outside of work. Let them know that you’re more than just the skills and experience you bring to the table and that you share a commitment to the same things.

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